How to paint a rifle stock

how to paint a rifle stock

Tips for Painting a Wood Rifle Stock

Paint the Stock Paint the stock with your chosen color, or colors. If working for a camouflage scheme, start with a base coat of khaki or almond or olive drab and then move to your darkest color and work your way to the lightest. For every layer or coat you do, allow 24 hours of drying in between to let the paint adhere to the stock. Apply masking tape to the interior bedding of the stock and over the butt plate (if attached). Use a razor blade to carefully trim the tape to contour with the exposed surface of the stock. Step 4 Spray an even, thin coat of epoxy-based primer onto the stock and let the primer dry.

It doesn't matter the reason you've decided to paint your wooden rifle stock, just that you have. Now, you need to know what it takes to actually accomplish getting it from its current condition to the picture-perfect rifle you want it to be. While painting a rifle stock how to paint a rifle stock the hardest project to undertake, it is one that can lead to difficulties if you're not prepared when you start.

Sandpaper is going to prove to be your best friend in how to fuse a transformer project, so expect to use plenty of it at varying grains from course to fine grit. These will be used to take the glossy lacquer off the top current layer of the rifle's stock and to smooth out any rough spots or cracks that your stock may have.

This is the best time to fix them and fill them in with filler, according to professional stock painter Mike Ricklefs. You'll want to choose a good primer, like a gray or a deep red, and you'll want plenty of painters' tape to cover up the parts you don't want to paint on.

In addition, you'll want some hot water, some degreaser, a pair of what to do this weekend in columbus gloves and brushes to apply your primer and your chosen paint. Use a course-grit sandpaper to work the lacquer finish off the stock of the gun.

This takes some patience but is required in order to properly paint the stock. Once the surface is sanded, wash the what happened to garth brooks ex wife in hot water.

Don't worry if you get some on the metal because the gun has gone through a process that protects it and a little water won't harm it. After washing the stock, let it dry. This will raise the grain of the wood and you'll sandpaper over it with a medium- to fine-grit sandpaper to smooth out the wood. Put on your rubber gloves and wash the stock with a degreasing soap, which is available in most auto shops or at larger department stores.

Use hot water and wash the stock thoroughly. This removes any grease from your hands and any remaining lacquer residue. From this point on, you'll want to keep how to shuck an oyster with an oyster knife gloves on when working with the stock to keep the natural oils on your skin from soaking into the wood.

Mask off any part of the gun you don't want to paint by using painters' tape. For larger areas, such as the barrel or the scope, consider covering with aluminum foil and taping around the edges to make the job easier.

Once the masking is complete, prime the stock with the primer of your choice. Cover all parts of the wood in order to allow for even painting. Let it dry for 24 hours. Paint the stock with your chosen color, or colors.

If working for a camouflage scheme, start with a base coat of khaki or almond or olive drab and then move to your darkest color and work your way to the lightest. For every layer or coat you do, allow how to paint a rifle stock hours of drying in between to let the paint adhere to the stock. Once your painting is complete, you can choose to cover it with a gloss coat or leave it as is. Make sure to remove all the tape from your gun and lubricate all of the working parts such as the action and the bolt with lubricant or 3-in-1 oil.

Sam Eggleston has been a journalist sinceworking primarily with Gannett, Ogden and Morris newspaper companies.

Related How to Remove Gun Bluing. The Tools You'll Need Sandpaper is going to prove to be your how to paint a rifle stock friend in this project, so expect to use plenty of it at varying grains from course to fine grit.

Sand the Stock Use a course-grit sandpaper to work the lacquer finish off the stock of the gun. Degrease the Stock Put on your rubber gloves and wash the stock with a degreasing soap, which is available in most auto shops or at larger department stores. Prepare for Painting Mask off any part of the gun you don't want to paint by using painters' tape. Paint the Stock Paint the stock with your chosen color, or colors. Finish Once your painting is complete, you can choose to cover it with a gloss coat or leave it as is.

Sand the Stock

Mar 27,  · Field & Stream's Gun Nuts learn how to paint your synthetic stock with a natural vegetation camouflage from MCC Gunsmithing instructor, Ryan Flynn. Jan 12,  · I have been stuck inside during the Polar Vortex of Death cold spell, so I spent time tinkering in the shop. I decided to try a Rustoleum paint product. Apr 20,  · Took my first shot at painting a black stock a few months ago. My son wanted his Savage 16 SS 7mm08 to be brown with black webbing look and a "sandy" feel. It turned out better than I was expecting for a first attempt. First I degreased/de-oiled the stock with acetone.

A mechanical engineer by trade, Mike is an artist at heart, who loves to create beautiful finishes for wood and glass stocks, as you can see on his website, www. Mike sticks to basic colors, gradients, and clear-coating. By his own admission, he doesn't do airbrushing or painted illustrations. However, in this article, we don't cover the use of masks and custom decals because that requires special templating equipment, and an experienced hand. If you want flames and paint-on logos, we suggest you leave that kind of work to the experts.

But otherwise, if you follow Mike's directions, use the right materials and methods, you can achieve outstanding results. Click HERE to see a variety of Mike's finished products, both with color paint and clear finish over wood laminate. The black base coat is applied in two 2 coats. Once that has flashed off dried then the Intercoat clear is applied. Xotic also makes a variety of specialized base coats for Candy, Pearlescent, metal-flake, and color-shift chameleon effects.

These require some skill in the application to achieve the final look you want, so experiment on a small sample before applying trick base-coats to your stock. These special-effect base-coat paints are quite expensive, so it's smart to learn the right techniques before spraying your entire stock.

Xotic paints in small quantities and kits with all needed supplies are available from www. Here you see a black base-coat applied to one of the Hunter BR stocks. It appears gray in the photo. However, the base coats dry to an even black, almost flat look. This is normal as it is the clear coat that gives it the shine.

Intercoat clear is applied where the paint masks will be applied. It acts as a protective barrier for the base coat. Above you see three 3 coats of black base and two 2 coats of Intercoat clear. You can see where I've applied flame masks applied and taped off other areas to be shielded from the black base coat.

Using masks takes some skill. We don't cover the use of masks in stock painting in this article, but you will find basic information on my website, www. The above photo shows a silver base coat. A silver or gold base coat is often preferred for bright candy colors and metallic finishes.

Wet sanding starts with grit. The pictures do not show much detail but this step knocks the surface down to one level and removes any orange peel or dirt nibs in the clear coat.

That is very important to achieve a mirror-like finish at the end. But after wet-sanding the stock will be dull at this point. Don't worry--the gloss will re-appear after buffing. A little dish-washing detergent in the water will make the paper last longer as it helps to flow out the particles.

Use clean water and plenty of it. You are trying to achieve a mirror-like surface and lots of water helps smooth away small imperfections, while carrying away the sanding residues. When wet-sanding, you must be careful on the edges. A little too much sanding here will make you start all over again. You can see the finish get duller as you work, so be conservative and use a light hand. However, if there are any shiny spots low spots at this point you need to keep sanding to level them out.

But be gentle and use plenty of water. You want to level the surface, not scratch it. After the final wet-sanding with grit, the next step is buffing using a clean foam pad. It is important to use a clean pad so you don't scratch the finish or leave any residues from previous jobs. I begin the buffing process with DuPont "Perfect It" compound.

After that I switch pads and go to the Meguiar's Swirl Remover. Be sure to shake the bottle thoroughly before use, and watch out for clumps. Finally a Hand Glaze is applied. The final glazing step is what really brings out the shine. You might want to practice on a sample first so you get the feel for how hard to work the pad. I do all this buffing at about RPM under power with a foam pad.

Be very careful on the edges as you can buff right through the clear in short order. If you put a run in the base coat you pretty much have to go back and recoat.

But a run in the clear is not the end of the world. Using grit paper and a lot of patience, you can sand out a run like it was never there. You have to be careful that the clear is fully cured as the run is a thicker area, so it takes longer to cure out.

No reproduction of any content without advanced permission in writing. Topics: Mike Ricklefs, Affordable Stock Painting, stock, benchrest stock, laminate, clearcoat, clear, clearcoat, paint, primer, sanding, putting, filler, base-coating, metallic, candy-coat, buffing, wet-sanding.

Guns of the Week. Articles Archive. BLOG Archive. Competition Info. Varmint Pages. FREE Targets. Top Gunsmiths. Bullet Reviews. Custom Actions. Gun Stocks. Vendor List. Event Calendar. Advertising INFO. Have you recently purchased a laminated wood stock that needs a finish, or a fiberglass stock that you want to customize?

Here's a step-by-step guide to stock painting and clear-coating. It guides you through the process, from initial stock prep and clean-up, to the final wet-sanding and buffing. These procedures work. Follow all local regulations pertaining to paint spraying and disposal. Always use a respirator and use a fresh-air system if possible. Paint in a well-ventilated area, and always follow manufacturers' safety guidelines for all products.

Begin by sanding, with progressively finer paper, all the way to grit. Certain laminated stocks are so rough when they come from the stock-maker, that you may have to be very aggressive at first. But be careful with angles and the edges of flats. You don't want to round these off as you sand. After sanding, use compressed air to blow out all dust from the pores of the wood. This is very important to avoid a "muddy" looking finish.

If you don't blow the dust out with air before spraying the clear it will migrate out as you apply the clear. Also, after each sanding session, clean your painting area to remove excess dust. I also wet down the floor of my spray booth to keept the dust down.

Some painters recommended using a filler to close the pores. That's one technique, but the filler can detract from the clarity of the final finish. Rather than use a pore-filling sealer, I use a high solids or "build" clear for the initial applications. This is slightly thicker than "finish" clear and does a good job of sealing the pores. Three 3 fairly heavy coats of "build" clear are applied. If you get a thick spot or a run in the finish at this point, it is not the end of the world but this does create more sanding work.

After waiting for the build coats to dry, sand the stock to grit again. At this point don't be disappointed on how the stock looks. You will not be able to fill all the grain with just one application. Another application of three 3 coats of "build" clear should be applied and sanded to grit. Depending on the density of the wood you now should have the grain filled after six 6 total coats of "build" clear.

If not, do one more application with the high build. If all the pores are filled then apply three 3 coats of low solids or "flow" clear. When dry, the "flow" clear is wet-sanded to then and buffed. A normal stock will take from 9 to 12 total coats of clear.

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