What is radiosonde used for

what is radiosonde used for

Radiosonde Data: NOAA (FIFE)

What is a Radiosonde? A radiosonde is a small weather station coupled with a radio transmitter. The radiosonde is attached to helium- or hydrogen-filled balloon, called variously a weather balloon or a sounding balloon, and the balloon lifts the radiosonde to altitudes exceeding , feet. Radiosonde, balloon-borne instrument for making atmospheric measurements, such as temperature, pressure, and humidity, and radioing the information back to a ground station.

NWS has been using balloon-borne radiosonde instruments since the late 's. The data they provide are critical for weather forecasting and research. Click here to learn more. Is it dangerous? Does the National Weather Service want it back? If you found a radiosonde, follow the instructions here: Found Radiosonde Instructions. Isn't there another observing system available that can provide the same data?

Presently, no single observing system e. A radiosonde observation provides only pressure, temperature, and relative humidity data. When a radiosonde is tracked so that winds aloft are provided in addition to the pressure, temperature, and relative humidity data, it is called a rawinsonde observation. Most stations around the world take rawinsonde observations.

However, meteorologists and other data users frequently refer to a rawinsonde observation as a radiosonde observation. Please Contact What is radiosonde used for. National Program. Front How to unlock a boost mobile lg venice. If you found a radiosonde, follow the instructions here: Found Radiosonde Instructions 3 What types of radiosondes does the NWS use in its network?

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The most common use of radiosondes is for synoptic soundings, which are released once or twice a day (at 00Z and 12Z) from fixed locations around the globe. These soundings are carried out simultaneously by national weather services around the world to create a three-dimensional picture of the Earth's atmosphere at one point in time. A radiosonde observation provides only pressure, temperature, and relative humidity data. When a radiosonde is tracked so that winds aloft are provided in addition to the pressure, temperature, and relative humidity data, it is called a rawinsonde observation. Most stations around the world take rawinsonde observations. radiosonde Instrument, comprising an aneroid barometer and sensors for temperature and humidity, that is carried aloft to the upper atmosphere by a balloon that ascends at about 5 m/s. Data is transmitted to the surface by radio.

The radiosonde is a small, expendable instrument package weighs to grams that is suspended below a large balloon inflated with hydrogen or helium gas. These sensors are linked to a battery powered, milliwatt or less radio transmitter that sends the sensor measurements to a sensitive ground tracking antenna on a radio frequency typically ranging from to MHz or around MHz.

Wind speed and direction aloft are also obtained by tracking the position of the radiosonde in flight using GPS or a radio direction finding antenna.

Observations where winds aloft are also obtained from radiosondes are called "rawinsonde" observations. The radio signals received by the tracking antenna are converted to meteorological values and from these data significant levels are selected by a computer, put into a special code form, and then transmitted to data users.

A typical NWS "weather balloon" sounding can last in excess of two hours. In that time, the radiosonde can ascend to an altitude exceeding 35 km about , feet and drift more than km about miles from the release point. When released, the balloon is about 1. When the balloon reaches a diameter of 6 to 8 meters 20 to 25 feet in diameter, it bursts.

A small, orange colored parachute slows the descent of the radiosonde, minimizing the danger to lives and property. At the present time, data are not collected while the radiosonde descends. Although all the data from the flight are used, data from the surface to the hPa pressure level about 7 km or 23, feet are considered minimally acceptable for NWS operations.

Worldwide, there are over upper-air observation stations and through international agreements data are exchanged between countries. When severe weather is expected additional soundings may be taken at a select number of stations.

NWS also supports the operation of 10 other stations in the Caribbean. If you find a fallen NWS radiosonde, follow the instructions on this website. Understanding and accurately predicting changes in the atmosphere requires adequate observations of the upper atmosphere. Radiosondes provide a primary source of upper-air data and will remain so into the foreseeable future. LMS-6 built by Lockheed Martin. History - History of upper-air observations.

Back to the Upper-air Observations Main Page. Please Contact Us. National Program. Radiosonde Observation Weather. Front Office. What is a radiosonde? I found a radiosonde. What should I do? If you find a fallen NWS radiosonde, follow the instructions on this website How are radiosonde data used? Radiosonde observations are applied to a broad spectrum of efforts.

Data applications include: - Input for computer-based weather prediction models; - Local severe storm, aviation, fire weather, and marine forecasts; - Weather and climate change research; - Input for air pollution models; - Ground truth for satellite data What types of radiosondes are used by the NWS?

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